About Kimberlie

I make jewelry and write tutorials.

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

ECT TV Episode 81

Hi and welcome to Emerging Creatively Tutorials TV (ECT TV) Episode 81!

I would love if you would subscribe to my YouTube channel.  Just click the YouTube button on the lower right side of the screen and when you get to the video on YouTube, click the red subscribe button. Thank you!

Here’s the video:

ECT TV Episode 81: How to Make a Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

In today’s episode I’m teaching you how to make a fun pendant design.  This pendant is great for all the long necklaces you may have been seeing if you happen to follow fashion trends, but if you prefer a shorter necklace it works well for that as well.

My inspiration for this necklace is an art journal page I created recently.

Art Journal Inspired

I love taking inspiration from my art journal pages to create jewelry designs — so much that I created an eCourse, called Inspired eCourse, where we go through creativity activities and journal prompts and then map out jewelry inspiration that we take from the art journal pages.

How I went from Art Journal Page to Jewelry Piece:

When I made this particular art journal page I wanted to feature the word inspire.  I chose the elements on the page around that general theme.  Butterflies have a very symbolic meaning for me, especially around creativity and the word inspire.

When pulling inspiration and ideas from an art journal page, you can go in several different ways.  I make a “Jewelry Map” from the art journal page that includes pulling out themes, colors, shapes, textures and techniques. (I teach this in detail in Inspired eCourse.)

In this case, I was most drawn to the colors and the butterfly theme of the page.

Sketching jewelry:

Typically I’ll sketch out my jewelry ideas after making the Jewelry Map.  In this case I went straight to picking out supplies.

Inspired Supplies

As I was choosing supplies the idea came to me.

Inspiration comes in different ways on different days for everyone. 

Sometimes I need to create a Jewelry Map, sketch out a bunch of ideas and then choose the idea to try.

Sometimes I look through old sketchbooks until I find something I designed previously.

Sometimes my inspiration comes from the materials themselves, like in this case.

However the inspiration comes, follow it.

Once I had the idea, I made a sample and then I created the tutorial to share!

ECT TV Episode 81: How to Make a Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Step-by-Step Photo Instructions:

Materials and Tools:

  • Focal bead
  • 5 smaller beads and/or charms (I used 4 beads and one charm) + optional extra bead for clasp
  • Headpins for all the smaller beads.  (I made my own knotted headpins.)
  • Chain
  • 4mm jump rings
  • Clasp ( used a lobster clasp)
  • 20 gauge half-hard, round wire
  • Optional:  Filigree piece
  • Wire cutters
  • Round nose pliers
  • Chain nose pliers
  • Bent nose pliers

Step #1

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Decide how long you want the tassel part of your pendant to be and cut 5 pieces of chain to that length.  I cut mine 1 1/2 inches.

I slide the chain on a piece of scrap wire so I can cut them all evenly.  See the full jewelry making tip: cutting chain.

Set the chain aside momentarily.

Step #2

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Cut a piece of wire a few inches long than your focal bead.

Step #3

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Hold the wire about 1 1/4 inches from the top in round nose pliers. Wrap the wire around the pliers to form a loop.

Step #4

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Slide the 5 pieces of chain into the loop you just formed.

Step #5

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Slide the chains to the side and hold the loop in chain nose pliers.

Wrap the short end of the wire around the long end while pulling out the long end to straighten the loop so it’s centered on the wire.

Step #6

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Wrap the wire around 2 more times, keeping the wraps tight, straight and next to each other. Trim off the excess wire making a flush cut.  Use chain nose pliers to make sure the end isn’t poking out.

Step #7

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Slide the focal bead on the wire.

Step #8

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Hold the wire in round nose pliers about 1/4 inch above the bead.  Wrap the wire around the round nose pliers to form a loop.

Follow the instructions above to complete a wire wrapped loop.

This would make a really cute pendant just as it is.  Just slide it on a chain and you’re set.

But I’ll show you how to bling it up even more.

Step #9

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Now we’ll make bead dangles with the smaller beads.

I made my own knotted head pins, as I mentioned in the materials section above.

Slide a bead onto the headpin.

Step #10

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Hold the wire with round nose pliers about 1/4 inch above the bead.  Form a loop by wrapping the wire around the pliers.

Step #11

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Hold the loop in chain nose pliers.  Wrap the wire around once while pulling the bead out straight to center the loop.

Step #12

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Wrap the wire around 2 more times. Trim the wire making a flush cut.  Use chain nose pliers to make sure the end isn’t poking out.

Repeat for all your smaller beads.

Step #13

 

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Attach one bead or charm to the end of each chain with 4mm jump rings.

How to properly open and close jump rings.

Step #14

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

If you like, attach the top of the focal bead to a filigree piece using a jump ring.

Then add 1/2 of the chain to each side of the filigree piece using jump rings.

If not, you can simply thread chain through the top loop of the focal bead or attach it to the chain using a jump ring if you want it to be more stable.

Step #15

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

Attach a clasp.

I used a lobster clasp on one side and a wire wrapped bead link on the other side.  I made one loop really large so it would be easier to hook with the lobster clasp.

ECT TV Episode 81: How to Make a Focal Bead Tassel Pendant

I hope you enjoyed today’s tutorial.

If you love making wire wrapped jewelry or you’re interested, you want to have a solid background.

Sign up for my free Quick Start Guide to Wire Wrapped Jewelry below.

I’ll take you through everything you need to know to get started with wire wrapped jewelry – from safety to exactly which tools you need to get started, where to get wire and some of the basic building block techniques you’ll use over and over again to finally creating a project.

Sign up for Free! Quick Start Guide to Wire Wrapped Jewelry:

* indicates required



Choose your Adventure



Would you like this tutorial in an easy to download and save form?  Get the PDF version below.  (It’s exactly the tutorial you see here, just in PDF form)

ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant PDF eBook
ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant PDF eBook
ECT TV Episode 81: Focal Bead Tassel Pendant Tutorial PDF
$3.00

Using Your Art Journal to Release

Using Your Art Journal to Release

An art journal can be anything you want it to be. 

That’s what I love most about it.  It’s a personal place (if you keep it personal) to experiment with different techniques and express your thoughts and feelings.

My earliest art journals were in my writing journals.  I called these diaries when I was a kid.  As I got older I started drawing in them here and there.

I remember in my 20s I had left a job.  The job was very stressful and very intense, but I also loved what I was doing.  Eventually I had to leave it because the stress was affecting my mental health.  I felt like I was abandoning the people I left behind, even though I left on good terms and I don’t think they felt abandoned.

I guess I felt bad because I was leaving for my own purposes, putting myself first and it felt really uncomfortable for me to do that.

I held this guilt for a while.  I wrote and wrote about it, but I didn’t feel much better.

Then one day I pulled out my colored pencils and did a page about releasing it all and moving on.  I remember it was a tree with leaves.

( I burn my journals to let them go every so often, so I don’t have that page to share with you.)

I felt so much better.  Drawing it out had worked so much better for me than just writing words.

Words are important, too.

I do have a daily practice of writing in a journal in the morning to get everything out before I start my day.  Plus throughout the day if I’m having a moment of anger or confusion and I don’t have someone readily available to talk to, I’ll put out my journal and write it all out.

But having that extra bit of creative expression really helped me move on in the situation with that job.

I’ve used that process over and over again in my life.  I didn’t know anything about art journals or that that was what I was doing.  I was just doing what naturally made me feel better.

Now I have a specific art journal practice.  I’ve shared lots of my art journal pages on this blog to hopefully inspire you.  I’ve gone through lots of different styles and techniques.  I love experimenting in an art journal.

I picked up art journaling because years ago I discovered painting, but I realized that I don’t have enough space in my home to hang them all.  And I didn’t really love every one of the paintings enough to display them anyway, but I still wanted to paint and make art.

Enter my art journal.  I can do all the same fun experimentation in my art journal and not have to figure out where to put the art then it’s done.  I can flip through the pages whenever I like.  And it’s great because I can express how I’m feeling via art, but not have to share it with anyone that I don’t want to.

As you know, I love making jewelry and my passion is helping others to learn how to make jewelry.  As much as I love jewelry making, there are times when I want to express myself in a different way that I can’t quite convey with jewelry.

As I made more and more art journal pages, filling up book after book, the pages started to influence my jewelry making.

For example, I could experiment with colors in my art journal and then translate that into a piece of jewelry.

I could take a theme from an art journal page and then think of ways I could use that inspiration in jewelry making.

I love this process so much that I created an eCourse to teach you about it as well called Inspired eCourse.

In Inspired eCourse, I give you creativity prompts and art journal prompts, you make an art journal page, and then I show you how to take inspiration from your art journal page to design and create jewelry.

So if you’ve thought about trying art journaling and you love making jewelry or if you’ve wondered how to put the two together, or if you are interested in more ways to get inspiration for your jewelry pieces, I suggest you check out Inspired eCourse.

Even if a full eCourse isn’t your thing, try making an art journal page and see how you can translate that into a piece of jewelry.

I chose this art journal page

Art Journal Inspiration

I encourage you to try out art journaling for yourself.  It doesn’t have to be elaborate.  You don’t need a bunch of supplies.

My first “art journal page” was simply a really sketchy tree drawing with colored pencils I had around with images and words I needed to see and read to let go of my feelings of guilt.  (And definitely don’t let the fear of “I can’t draw” hold you back.  I can’t either.  No one has to see your art journal.)

Do you have something you need to let go of?  Try using art journaling as tool to help.

How to Use the 20 Questions to Ask Yourself When You’re Designing Jewelry

How to use the 20 questions

A few years ago I wrote a blogpost with 20 questions to ask yourself when you’re designing jewelry.

That post is super helpful when you’re making jewelry design decisions, whether you’re making jewelry for yourself, a gift or to sell.

If you’re making jewelry for someone else it’s especially important to think about the person wearing the final jewelry piece.  When you’re making jewelry for yourself a lot of these questions you’ll already instinctively know the answer to for the questions.

Today I wanted to go through the questions one-by-one and explain a little more about each one and how to incorporate it a little more into your design process.

1.  Are you making earrings, a bracelet, a necklace, a ring, or some other piece of jewelry?

This is a great place to start because most of us jewelry designers make jewelry because we love making jewelry, so we mostly want to make what we feel like making.

Perhaps you have a special request for a necklace or ring from a friend or customer or you just simply need a piece of jewelry to complete a certain outfit.

2.  Who are you designing it for?

  • Yourself?
  • On-the-go mom?
  • Business woman?
  • Teenager?
  • Bride?

If you don’t know who the actual jewelry piece is for, it’s difficult to design it.  Even if you’re making a piece of jewelry to sell and you don’t specifically know the final recipient of the jewelry piece, you need to know who your ideal customer is and a little bit about her and her life.

3.  Does she have any metal allergies?

This is important so you know the correct metal to choose for the piece.  If you’re making earrings for your mom and you know that anything but gold or sterling silver irritate her ears, certainly you want to use gold or sterling silver for the earring wires.

(If you’re making jewelry to sell, you want to make sure to state what kind of metal you’re using in all your pieces so that people with metal allergies know.)

4.  Where will she be wearing the piece?

  • Work? (And what is the work setting – office, retail, etc.?)
  • School?
  • Running errands?
  • PTO?
  • Wedding?
  • Out to dinner?
  • A party?

This question goes along with Question #2 about knowing the person you’re designing the piece for.  However, it goes a bit further to ask you wear will she be wearing the jewelry.

If you’re making your best friend a bracelet to wear to work, for example, it’s helpful to consider her job and how much wear and tear the bracelet will get so you know if you should make it more simple and dainty or if you can go big and bulky.

If you’re making the jewelry to sell, it’s good to have an idea of where you think the customer would wear the piece.  She will decide ultimately where she’s wearing the jewelry, of course, but it’s still helpful to consider it when you’re designing it.

5.  What are the needs of that person?  (i.e. the bracelet needs to stay out of the way when she’s typing, etc.)

Consider any special needs of the person when she’s wearing the jewelry piece.  If she has a difficult time getting bracelets on by herself and she lives alone, how can you make it easier for her to put on the bracelet and take it off herself, for example.

6.  What will she be doing while she’s wearing the piece?  (How durable does it need to be?  Is there anything to take into consideration about her activities while wearing the piece?)

Does she have an active lifestyle running from one activity to the next or a more serene lifestyle?  Think about the sturdiness of the piece, as well as anything that may dangle from the piece.

Now we’ll get more into the fun, design aspects of the jewelry.

7.  What will be the focal point of the piece?

Each jewelry piece should have an element that is the main focus of the entire piece.  Decide what that will be for your piece (considering all of the other previous questions.)

8.  Will be be symmetrical or asymmetrical?

Symmetrical is classic but asymmetrical adds more motion and whimsy to your piece.

9.  What colors will you use?

Choose your color scheme.  You may want to choose a favorite color or a birthstone if it’s a gift.

10.  How long will it be?

If it’s a necklace, how long will it be and where do you want it to lay?  If it’s a bracelet, do you have the recipient’s size or can you make it adjustable.  For earrings, will they be long or short?

11.  Will it be big and bold or small and dainty?

It could be bold with colors or bold with large chunky beads or smaller, more subdued beads and findings.

12.  Will it be colorful and vibrant or more subdued?

How bright and colorful do you want your jewelry piece to be, keeping in mind your recipient and where she might be wearing the jewelry.

13. Will it have dangley parts, and will this work with her lifestyle?

Considering the answers to the previous questions, think about any parts that may stick out or dangle and how that will work with her life.

14.  Will you do a wire wrapped piece, or will you use mixed media, adding in other techniques and materials or some other technique?

Think about the different techniques you know and decide how you will create the piece.  Will you mix the techniques to create an interesting, new piece or stick to the basics for a classic look?

15.  What materials will you use?  (i.e. what beads, etc.)

Also do you have the materials on hand already or what do you need to order or shop for?

16.  Will there be several parts that are all connected?  And how will they be connected?  Or will there be more longer pieces to connect?

This is to help you think about what findings you may need and how everything is going to be put together.

17.  What kind of wire will you use?

Think back to the metal allergies question from before.  Do you need to use any particular metal so that the recipient won’t be irritated?  Do you have the wire you need on hand?

18.  How does the recipient want to feel when she’s wearing it?

  • Sassy?
  • Pretty?
  • Free spirited?
  • Peppy?
  • Cheerful?
  • Thoughtful?
  • Quirky?
  • Adventurous?
  • Classy?
  • Elegant?

(or some other feeling…)

How can you convey that feeling in the jewelry you’re making for her?  Think about colors, the size and shape of the beads or stones, what metals and wires you’ll use and what other findings.

19.  Does she have any special needs getting the piece on?  

For example, some women have a difficult time putting on bracelets themselves.  Will she have someone to help her or can you make it easier for her?

Some people have difficulty getting rings over knuckles, so making an adjustable ring would be helpful.

20.  How heavy will the piece be?  

If you’re making earrings for someone else, err on the lighter side.  Necklaces and bracelets can be heavier, but make sure the recipient will be comfortable wearing the piece.

I hope that helps you think out your jewelry designs so you’re making meaningful and thoughtful jewelry, which is what the whole point of handcrafted jewelry is, isn’t it?

For more on Jewelry Design, check out this article on the 7 Basic Principles of Jewelry Design.

Get tons of inspiration for your jewelry designs in Inspired eCourse.

In Inspired eCourse, I give you creativity prompts and art journal prompts to create your own art journal pages and then take you step-by-step through the process of how to get inspiration from your art journal page and map out and sketch jewelry design ideas.

Inspired eCourse

In the class there is a jewelry project each week.  Students typically create their own jewelry designs and complete them each week, but I provide the jewelry tutorial as inspiration and instruction for perhaps new techniques that you don’t already know or to give you ideas for your own piece.

If you’re new to art journals, Inspired eCourse’s introduction is an introduction to art journaling.  And even if you’re not new, you may learn some fun new ideas and techniques.

After the intro there’s 4 weeks of class with each week having art journal and creativity prompts, creating art journal pages, pulling out inspiration from art journal pages and making jewelry.

Learn more and sign up for inspired eCourse here:  Inspired eCourse.

Inspired eCourse

 

Soar: Art Journal Inspiration to Inspired Jewelry Piece

Soar:  Art Journal Inspiration to Inspired Jewelry Piece

Last week I shared my art journal pages so far in my new art journal this year.

This page, “Soar,” is one of those pages.  In that blogpost I also shared my layering technique for each of the pages and what materials I used to create each page.

Soar:  Art Journal Inspiration to Inspired Jewelry Piece

Today I wanted to share a jewelry piece that was inspired by that art journal page.

Soar:  Art Journal Page to Inspired Jewelry Piece

How I went from art journal page to jewelry

When I use an art journal page as inspiration for a jewelry piece, I have a process that I call “mapping.”

I look at the page and look for themes, colors, shapes and textures that I can pull out of the page.  Then I think of techniques I can use to translate those ideas into jewelry pieces.

Then I sketch jewelry ideas and choose which idea I want to pursue.  (And, of course, save the other sketches for another time.)

Soar:  Art Journal Page to Inspired Jewelry Piece

For this piece, I choose blue because it was very prominent in the art journal page.

The quote that is the most important to me on the page is, “Not only could she fly, she could SOAR.”  And the page has a lot of birds on the page as well. So I choose feathers as a symbol of flying – and soaring.  I added a bird to the clasp that I made myself as well.

Materials I used for this piece:

  • Recycled sea glass beads in a gorgeous blue color that I made into wire wrapped bead links and connected with jump rings.
  • Feather charms.  The charms had a hole on each side and they actually came in a chain that I took apart so I could use my own jump rings
  • Jump rings that I made myself.
  • Chain.
  • Clasp that I made.  It’s a hook clasp and the other side is a wire wrapped bead link made with a little bird bead.

Soar:  Art Journal Page to Inspired Jewelry Piece

The result is this lovely necklace that isn’t just beautiful, but it’s really meaningful and inspiring to me.  When I wear it I remember to not only fly, but to soar.

I often take inspiration from my art journal pages to create jewelry pieces.  I love the process so much that I created an entire eCourse around it called Inspired eCourse.

In Inspired eCourse, I give you creativity prompts and art journal prompts to create your own art journal pages and then take you step-by-step through the process of how to get inspiration from your art journal page and map out and sketch jewelry design ideas.

Inspired eCourse

In the class there is a jewelry project each week.  Students typically create their own jewelry designs and complete them each week, but I provide the jewelry tutorial as inspiration and instruction for perhaps new techniques that you don’t already know or to give you ideas for your own piece.

If you’re new to art journals, Inspired eCourse’s introduction is an introduction to art journaling.  And even if you’re not new, you may learn some fun new ideas and techniques.

After the intro there’s 4 weeks of class with each week having art journal and creativity prompts, creating art journal pages, pulling out inspiration from art journal pages and making jewelry.

Learn more and sign up for inspired eCourse here:  Inspired eCourse.

Inspired eCourse

 

Jewelry Making Quick Tip: Covering Crimp Beads with Wire

Covering crimp beads with wire

I was finishing up a bracelet that I was making with the wire beads that I showed you how to make in ECT TV Episode 80 and I realized I only had silver crimp beads.

Instead of waiting to get the right color, I decided to finish the bracelet with the silver crimp beads and come up with a solution.

Here’s what I came up with:

Covering crimp beads with wire

Here’s the full bracelet:

Covering crimp beads with wire

Do you want to make beautiful wire jewelry, but you’re not sure where to start?  Not sure what wire to choose (which hardness or what gauge to use) and there are so many tools to pick from, where do you even start?

Not to mention how people get those perfect wraps and loops and make their wire jewelry look so nice.

What if you could spend days learning everything you needed to know to get started and make your first piece of wire jewelry?

With the FREE 10 Day Quick Start Guide to Wire Wrapped Jewelry, you’ll do just that!  Sign up below and get started right away!

Get the Quick Start Guide to Wire Wrapped Jewelry:

* indicates required



Choose your Adventure